Age well—never get rid of your bicycle!

Follow in the footsteps of Mr. Robert Marchand—the 105-year-old cyclist

Never get rid of your bicycle.

Especially not when you retire. (It’s anyway not a good idea to retire.) Keep your pedal bike at hand, well after you turn 60, or 70, or 80, or 90 and even long after you turn a hundred.

This is what Robert Marchand did, a 105-year-old Parisian. He is the present world-record holder for the longest distance cycled in one hour by a 100+-year-old: 26,92 km. (Record set in January 2014.) In January 2017, aged 105, he “slowed down” to 22,5 km in one hour.

Robert Marchand - IMG - Daily Mail

Robert Marchand – IMG – Daily Mail

Peek inside my novella, Be Good. Part II

More non-spoiler excerpts from the prequel to Be Silent

Both my novel, Be Silent, and its prequel, Be Good, a novella, was published late December 2016. (Both are 20th-century historical action adventures.) They are both available at Amazon (eBook and Paperback), Nook, Kobo and iBooks. The digital format of Be Silent is FREE. Inside the front matter of Be Silent is a hyperlink to obtain a FREE digital download of Be Good as well.

Enjoy!

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Goodbye 2016!

How to embrace 2017 making only two resolutions!

And a happy New Year to you too!

We have flipped the calendar page—2016 is part of history.

How exciting to stand on the threshold of yet another year, 2017! Well-rested, healthy, happy, our finances in order, with our New Year’s resolutions all written down and under our belt. In one word: we’re ready! We are pumped, all psyched up and ready to roll.

Many of us will scoff—yeah, in your dreams.

Alexandre Chambon - unsplash.com

Alexandre Chambon – unsplash.com

7 Insights I gained from a carrot, a scarf, and a ball of snow

Yes, life-lessons can be learned from a snowman—when followed by a winter storm.

It’s only a stupid snowman!

Not so fast. Yes, it’s a snowman. I was wrong too, thinking it to be silly and mundane. Dismissing it as child’s play—as unimportant—as frivolous. It’s neither silly, stupid, nor infantile.

Let me tell you why.
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We can win the war on hopelessness

Contrary to popular belief—all is not lost

Life sucks.

If only I can find happiness—this is the sigh of millions, if not billions, around the globe. If I can find happiness, life will no longer be so without purpose, without direction, without depth and meaning. I will no longer be without hope.

IMG - Luca Upper - unsplash.com

IMG – Luca Upper – unsplash.com

Basotho ponies and the mountain kingdom clinic

(From my collection of creative nonfiction short, short stories)

The gravel road wounded higher and higher into the mountains—its broken surface unending—an injustice even to the hardiest of 4×4 vehicles. Our rear-wheel drive Volkswagen Kombis showed the stalwart medal they were made of, as we steered with caution to avoid the dragon-tooth rocky protrusions that paved the mountain road. Our progress was so painful and precarious, that no dust trail was left behind the vehicles.

Malealea Band, Lesotho - visualhunt.com

Malealea Band, Lesotho – visualhunt.com

These 10 things will happen when you learn a second or a third language

You’re never too old (or too young) to become a polyglot!

I met a thirty-something gentleman last year who arrived in North America five years ago. We conversed in English—his fifth language. He was born in the Middle East, and grew up with Kurdish, Arabic and Farsi. Ten years ago he moved to Cyprus and mastered Greek. When he crossed the Atlantic, he conquered the Queen’s tongue.

What I found most intriguing about the man, was his remark when we parted ways, “You know what I’m going to learn next, sir? Spanish and French.”

There was no doubt in my mind that he would do exactly that.

visualhunt.com - IMG - Magdalar

visualhunt.com – IMG – Magdalar

Images of New York City: looking at life and work with new eyes

Through a different lens. PART 2

Reflecting on the lives we live, the question remains—how can we look at it with new eyes?

Are we able to look beyond the obvious, the mere physical objects that our eyes, optic nerves, and visual cortexes—our brains, register? For many of us, even that is a haze. We are too busy with our manicured, über-managed lives to notice. And if we do notice, do we register—does it impact us at all?

A place where friends and family meet - take care of them

A place where friends and family meet – take care of them